Paying Tithes and Offerings

May 11th, 2007  |  Published in Finances, Mormonism

From the LDS Church pamphlet “If Ye Are Prepared”, the first step to family finances is to pay tithes and offerings. This pamphlet is accompanied by an online lesson financial course entitled “Peace in Your Hearts“.

Paying tithing shows our faith

As seen in the Bible, tithing is a commandment from God. When we fulfill any of God’s commandments with purpose, we show our faith in Him. Also, his promises are great for us. As the apostle Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin reminds us,

“First, pay your tithing. Do you want the windows of heaven opened to you? Do you wish to receive blessings so great there is not room enough to receive them? 7 Always pay your tithing and leave the outcome in the hands of the Lord.

Obedience to God’s commandments is the foundation for a happy life. Surely we will be blessed with the gifts of heaven for our obedience. Failure to pay tithing by those who know the principle can lead to heartache in this life and perhaps sorrow in the next.”

Giving Offerings helps you rise above yourself

Offerings are other donations given to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to benefit others. There are several types of offerings that one can give to the church, and each of these are in turn given to those in need.

Fast offerings are one of the most common types of these donations, and we are encouraged to give a generous fast offering to accompany our monthly fasts. During these periods of fasting, we can give of ourself temporally (through these offerings) as well as spiritually (in dedication to the Lord and through prayer). This helps us to rise above ourselves and to increase our focus to those around us who might not have the means financially to provide for themselves.

President Gordon B. Hinckley, our current prophet, said:

“Think … of what would happen if the principles of fast day and the fast offering were observed throughout the world. The hungry would be fed, the naked clothed, the homeless sheltered. Our burden of taxes would be lightened. The giver would not suffer but would be blessed by his small abstinence. A new measure of concern and unselfishness would grow in the hearts of people everywhere” (in Conference Report, Apr. 1991, 73; or Ensign, May 1991, 52–53).

Follow the other sections in the Family Finance Overview.

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